WORKSAFEPAT 

                                     

THE LAW STATES THAT... ' AS MAYBE NECESSARY TO PREVENT DANGER, ALL SYSTEMS SHALL BE MAINTAINED SO AS TO PREVENT, AS FAR AS IS REASONABLY PRACTICABLE,  SUCH DANGER'. 

Do you have an effective maintenance system in your workplace that could help you to comply with legislation?

WORKSAFEPAT Ltd was formed to provide services relating to Health & Safety with a core emphasis on electrical appliance safety inspections and testing.

Our aim is to provide our customers with the latest advise from the Health and Safety Executive when it comes to the maintenance of electrical appliances.

The Health and Safety Executive produced guidance note HSG107 (3rd Edition) which is relevant to both user and employee safety within the workplace.

 

The Health and Safety Executive has produced this summary to help you check whether you are managing the risks from portable electrical equipment effectively. 


WORKSAFEPAT can help you:


1. Set up a maintenance plan for portable electrical equipment.

2. Identify which portable electrical equipment needs to be maintained and find
out where it is used and how.
3. Decide what to do about ‘unauthorised equipment’ brought in by employees.
4.  Provide straightforward training and information for all users (including yourself)
to help carry out user checks including what to do if they find a fault.
5.  Set up a formal visual inspection system and train someone to carry this out.
6.  Consider producing brief, written guidance on the formal visual inspection, what
to look for and procedures to follow when faults are found and when unauthorised equipment is in use.
7.  Decide on and undertake the appropriate frequency for formal visual inspection.
If records of formal visual inspections are kept, the findings can be reviewed
and the records used to help you decide how frequently these inspections
should be carried out.
8. Assign someone to do the combined inspection and test of equipment that: 

 a) is suspected of being defective (where this cannot be determined by visual

examination);


 b) has been repaired or modified (this may be a specialised activity);
 c) is due for a combined inspection and test; or
  has been in use for longer than the interval between combined inspections
and tests but has never had one (for example because you are just starting a
maintenance system). 


We can also help you to:
■ Make sure that the person carrying out combined inspection and testing has
sufficient knowledge, training and experience as well as access to further
information and advice where necessary.
■ Decide on an appropriate frequency for combined inspection and testing where
this is necessary.
■ Review test results to decide how frequently you should carry out combined
inspections and tests.
■ Monitor all the arrangements and make sure that follow-up action is carried out,
including a review of the frequency of formal visual inspection.
It is important that you do not use items that fail maintenance checks until they have been repaired by a competent person